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Keywords = Yi Wang

  • Open Access Research Article
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2018, 3(1), 1-9. http://doi.org/10.31586/Biology.0301.01
    471 Views 196 Downloads 1 Shares PDF Full-text (2.732 MB) PDF Full-text (2.744 MB) PDF Full-text (2.744 MB)  HTML Full-text
    Abstract
    Animals usually use photoperiod as an important environmental cue to time the year. In terms of the winter immunocompetence enhancement hypothesis, animals in the non-tropical zone would actively enhance their immune function to decrease the negative influence of stressors such as low temperature and food shortage in winter. In the
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    Animals usually use photoperiod as an important environmental cue to time the year. In terms of the winter immunocompetence enhancement hypothesis, animals in the non-tropical zone would actively enhance their immune function to decrease the negative influence of stressors such as low temperature and food shortage in winter. In the present study, we mimicked the transition from summer to winter by decreasing photoperiod gradually and examined the variations of immune repsonses in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) to test this hypothesis. Twenty two female adult hamsters were randomly divided into the control (12h light: 12h dark, Control, n=11) and the gradually decreasing photoperiod group (Experiment, n=11). In the experiment group, day length was decreased from 12 h: 12 h light-dark cycle to 8 h: 16 h light-dark cycle at the pace of half an hour per week. We found that gradually decreasing photoperiod had no effect on body composition (wet carcass mass, subcutaneous, retroperitoneal, mesenteric and total body fat mass) and the masses of the organs detected such as brain, heart, liver and so on in hamsters. Similarly, immunological parameters including immune organs (thymus and spleen), white blood cells and serum bacteria killing capacity indicative of innate immunity were also not influenced by gradually decreasing photoperiod, which did not support the winter immunocompetence enhancement hypothesis. However, gradually decreasing photoperiod increased phytohaemagglutinin response post-24h of PHA challenge, which supported this hypothesis. There was no correlation between cellular, innate immunity and body fat mass, suggesting that body fat was not the reasons of the changes of cellular immunity. In summary, distinct components of immune system respond to gradually decreasing photoperiod differently in Siberian hamsters.  Full article
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  • Open Access Research Article
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2019, 4(3), 106-110. http://doi.org/10.31586/Cancers.0403.03
    154 Views 276 Downloads PDF Full-text (689.500 KB) PDF Full-text (689.500 KB)  HTML Full-text
    Abstract
    Objective: This study aimed to determine whether perioperative antiviral treatment is facilitate for patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and Child-Pugh grade A cirrhosis in perioperative recovery of liver function and HBV activation. Methods: The study included 115 patients with HBV-related HCC and Child-Pugh grade A cirrhosis
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    Objective: This study aimed to determine whether perioperative antiviral treatment is facilitate for patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and Child-Pugh grade A cirrhosis in perioperative recovery of liver function and HBV activation. Methods: The study included 115 patients with HBV-related HCC and Child-Pugh grade A cirrhosis who underwent resection. Patients were prospectively assigned to a preoperative antiviral treatment group (n = 51) or postoperative antiviral treatment group (n = 52); twelve patients who had not received antiviral treatment before and after surgery were designated a non-treatment group (n = 12). HBV reactivation during a month after the operation was defined as a HBV DNA value tenfold over preoperative values. Postoperative liver dysfunction was defined as prothrombin activity <50% and serum bilirubin >50 mmol/L on postoperative day 5. Results: Postoperatively, liver dysfunction was present in 1 of 51 (1.96%) patients who received preoperative antiviral therapy, 1 of 52 (1.92%) who received postoperative therapy, and 3 of 12 (25%) who received no antiviral therapy. HBV reactivation postoperatively occurred at similar rates. Conclusions: Preoperative and postoperative antiviral treatment of patients with Child-Pugh grade A cirrhosis and high levels of HBV DNA undergoing hepatic resection for HCC are both facilitate in preventing perioperative liver dysfunction and reactivation of HBV. Thus, in this population with high levels of HBV DNA, perioperative antiviral treatment is important.  Full article
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