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Keywords = plants

  • Open Access Research Article
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2014, 1(1), 1-11. http://doi.org/10.31586/Agrochemistry.0101.01
    93 Views 256 Downloads 3 Citations PDF Full-text (461.204 KB)  HTML Full-text
    Abstract
    We present the results of a comprehensive long-term experiment on intensive cultivation of wheat and tomato plants to initially abiogenous mineral substrate. The experiment simulates the primary processes of soil formation. For the first time is established dynamic synergistic and antagonistic interrelations between the chemical elements (Si, Al, Fe, Mg,
    [...] Read more.
    We present the results of a comprehensive long-term experiment on intensive cultivation of wheat and tomato plants to initially abiogenous mineral substrate. The experiment simulates the primary processes of soil formation. For the first time is established dynamic synergistic and antagonistic interrelations between the chemical elements (Si, Al, Fe, Mg, Ca, K, P, S, Cl, Na, Mn, Zn) in various plant tissues (roots, fruits, grain, stems, leaves) under condition of primary soil formation. We have identified the dynamics of accumulation and differentiation of collective state of the chemical elements in different plant tissues by the methods of information theory.  Full article
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    Figure 2 of 6

    References
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    Ermakov E.I., Zvereva T.S. and Rybalchenko O.V. (2000). Change of crushed granite under perennial crops of wheat and tomato. Pochvovedenie. (Euroasian Soil Science). N.12, 1463- 1471.
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    Rinkis G.Y., Ramana H.K. and Paegle G.V. (1979). Basics of mineral nutrition of plants. In: Macro-and microelements in mineral nutrition of plants. Rinkis G.Y. (ed.). Ed. Zinatne, Riga.
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    Barber S.A.(1983). Soil Nutrient Bioavailability. Mechanistic Approach. A.Wiley Interscience Publication, John Wiley and Sons. New York, Chichester, Brisbone, Toronto, Singapore.
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    Kabata-Pendias A. and Pendias H. (1986). Trace Elements in Soils and Plants. CRC Press. Inc. Boca Raton, Florida.
    [10]
    Ermakov E.I, Zuev V.S. and Anikina L.M. (2005). Moisture condition at the interface as the indicator of the intensity of the process of primary soil formation. Pochvovedenie, ?2, 195-202.
    [11]
    Ermakov E.I., Anikina L.M. and Chaikovskaya L.A. (1987). Inventor?s Certificate, no. 1303063. Bull. Izobret., no.14.
    [12]
    Mukhomorov V.K. and Anikina L.M. (2011). Dynamics of chemical elements in plants. Primary soil formation. Lambert Academic Publisher. Saarbr?cken. Germany. 2012 (in Russian). 265 p.
    [13]
    Ermakov E.I. and Mukhomorov V.K. (2001). Evolution of diversity measures as a reflection of the process of primary soil formation in a model soil-plant system. Doklady Biochemistry and Biophysics. 379, 297-301.
    [14]
    Ermakov E.I. and Anikina L.M. (2007). Formation of organic compounds and their role in the transformation of mineral rooting medium in a controlled agroecosystem. Russian Agricultural Sciences. ? 6, 30-32.
    [15]
    Samsonova N.E. (2005). Kremniy v pochve i rasteniyakh. (Silicon in soil and plants). AgroKhimia. (Agrochemistry). ?6, 76-86.
    [16]
    Goldschmidt V.M. (1934). The crystal structure and chemical composition. Uspekhi Khimii. 3, 448.
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    Ermakov E.I., Mukhomorov V.K. and Anikina L.M. (2006). Cause-and-effect relations in the distribution of chemical elements in plant organs during long-term cultivation in a regulated agroecosystem. Russian Agricultural Sciences. no. 3, 1-4.
    [18]
    Mukhomorov V.K. (2013). Dynamics of the information exchange and the causal-and-effect relationships in plants under controlled conditions. World Journal of Agricultural Research. 1, no.1, 18-24.
    [19]
    Mukhomorov V.K. and Anikina L.M. (2011). Information flows between organic matter of the roots environment and elemental chemical composition of plants under primary pedogenic conditions. Russian Agricultural Sciences. 37, no. 4, 322-326.
    [20]
    Ermakov E.I. and Mukhomorov V.K. (2009). Productional process of plants and the diversity of interactions of edaphic factors in a controlled agroecosystem. In: Ermakov E.I. Selected works. Eds. Yakushev V.P., Panova G.G., Stepanova O.A. St.-Petersburg, pp.48-54.
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    Mac Arthur R. 1955. Fluctuations of animal populations, and a measure of community stability. Ecology. 36, 533-536.
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    Shannon C. (1963). Works on Information Theory and Cybernetics. Moscow.
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    Kolmogorov A.N. (1987). Information Theory and Theory of Algorithms. Nauka. Moscow.
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    Mukhomorov V.K. and Anikina L.M. (2009). Information streams and plant productivity. American-Eurasian Journal of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences. 5, 387-392.
    [25]
    Ermakov E.I. and Medvedeva I.V. (1985). In: Physiological patterns of ontogeny and plant productivity. Leningrad. pp. 155- 185.
  • Open Access Research Article
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2014, 1(1), 17-25. http://doi.org/10.31586/Agrophysical.0101.03
    54 Views 205 Downloads 1 Citations PDF Full-text (221.837 KB)  HTML Full-text
    Abstract
    We result statistical analysis of experimental data on physical modeling of primary soil formation under long and continuous cultivation of plants on initially abiogenous mineral substrates (granite crushed stone, zeolite). The purpose of the experiment was to follow the dynamics of the evolutionary changes in the mineral substrate under condition
    [...] Read more.
    We result statistical analysis of experimental data on physical modeling of primary soil formation under long and continuous cultivation of plants on initially abiogenous mineral substrates (granite crushed stone, zeolite). The purpose of the experiment was to follow the dynamics of the evolutionary changes in the mineral substrate under condition long-term operation. We used the information approach to quantitative analyze of the relationship of primary soil formation process with the vital activity of plants (tomato, spring wheat) under controlled conditions. We analyzed the dynamics of the diversity of emerging organic matter in the mineral substrate and the biotic community. To quantify the diversity of multicomponent systems, we used information function. We have shown that the dynamics of plant productivity was statistically significant related to the parameter of information exchange between emerging organic matter and biotic community. It has been established that the increase in the total content of organic matter in the mineral substrate does not have a statistically significant correlation with the productivity of plants.  Full article
    Figures

    Figure 6 of 7

    References
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    Mukhomorov V.K., and Anikina L.M. (2012) Dynamics of Mineral Elements in Plants. Primary Soil Formation. LAMBERT Academic Publishing. Saarbr?cken (in Russian).
    [2]
    Assing I.A. (1950) Izv. Akad. Nauk Kazakh. SSR. Ser. Pochv., no.6, 101-108.
    [3]
    Polynov B.K. Selected Works, Academy of Sciences USSR, 1956.
    [4]
    Popov A.I. (2004) Humic Substances: Properties, Structure, and Formation, St.Petersburg (in Russian).
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    Alexandrova L.N. (1980) Soil Organic Matter and Processes of Its Transformation. Leningrad: Nauka (in Russian).
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    Ermakov E.I. (1984) USSR Author?s Certificate, Bull. 21.
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    Ermakov A.I. (1987) Methods of Biochemical Investigation of Plants. Leningrad (in Russian).
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    Shannon C.E. (1948) A Mathematical Theory of Communication. Bell Sys. Tech. Journal, 27, 379-423, 623-656.
    [9]
    Kolmogorov A.N. (1987) Information Theory and Theory of Algorithms. Nauka, Moscow (in Russian).
    [10]
    Mukhomorov V.K., and Anikina L.M. (2011) Information Flows between Organic Matter of the Roots Environment and Elemental Chemical Composition of Plants under Primary Pedogenic Conditions. Russian Agricultural Sciences, 37, 322-326.
    [11]
    Essays on the Use of Information Theory in Biology. (1953) Kastler H., Ed. Univ. Illinois Press, Urbana.
    [12]
    Mukhomorov V.K., and Anikina L.M. (2014). Evolutionary Dynamics of Intercoupling of the Chemical Elements in Plants and Primary Soil-Forming Processes. Trends Journal of Sciences Research, 1(1), 1-11.
    [13]
    Fleis J. (1973) Statistical Methods for Rates and Proportions. Wiley, New York.
    [14]
    Ermakov E.I., Anikina L.M. and Mukhomorov V.K. (1990). Soderzhaniye nitratov v produktsii ovoshchnykh i zernovykh kul'tur v zavisimosti ot kolichestva organicheskogo veshchestva v korneobitayemykh sredakh (The nitrate content in the production of vegetable and cereal crops, depending on the amount of organic matter in the rooting medium). Doklady Rossiyskoy akademii sel'skokhozyaystvennykh nauk (Reports of the Russian Academy of Agricultural Sciences), no.11,14-17. (in Russian).
  • Open Access Research Article
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2014, 1(1), 28-37. http://doi.org/10.31586/Agrophysical.0101.05
    309 Views 623 Downloads 1 Citations PDF Full-text (1.969 MB)  HTML Full-text
    Abstract
    We analyze the experimental data on the dynamics of water and mineral metabolism of tomato plants by using the methods of spectral analysis. Plants were cultivated under controlled conditions. We have used the various compositions of juvenile analogues of thin-layer soil. It is shown that the composition of the soil
    [...] Read more.
    We analyze the experimental data on the dynamics of water and mineral metabolism of tomato plants by using the methods of spectral analysis. Plants were cultivated under controlled conditions. We have used the various compositions of juvenile analogues of thin-layer soil. It is shown that the composition of the soil analogue significantly affects the dynamics of water-mineral metabolism of plants and plant productivity. It was found that the dynamics of the water and mineral metabolism of plants has a clear oscillatory structure. We have identified the most intense frequencies of this process. It was found that in order to maximize the productivity of plants it is necessary that the process of transpiration should contain simultaneously both high-frequency and low-frequency periodicities. This creates the most favorable environment for the development and functioning of the plant root system. It was shown that vibrations of water metabolism closely connected with the vibrations of the content of chemical elements in plants.  Full article
    Figures

    Figure 1 of 9

    References
    [1]
    Mukhomorov V.K., and Anikina L.M. 2012. Dynamics of Mineral Elements in Plants. Primary Soil Formation. LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing. Germany. Saarbr?cken. (in Russian).
    [2]
    Mukhomorov V.K., Anikina L.M. Stepanova O.A. (2007) Dinamika produktivnosti i kachestva rastitel'noy produktsii i ikh svyaz's informatsionnym obmenom mezhdu sistemami organicheskoye veshchestvo-mikrobioticheskoye soobshchestvo pri pervichnom pochvoobrazovanii. (The dynamics of efficiency and quality of plant products and their relation with information exchange between systems of organic matter and biotic community during of the primary pedogenesis). In: Modern agrophysics for the high agrotechnologies. International Conference. St. Petersburg, Sept., 25-27, 2007, pp. 210-211. (in Russian).
    [3]
    Mukhomorov V.K., and Anikina L.M. (2008) Information Streams in Coupled Organic Matter-Microbiotic Community Systems of the Root-Inhabited Media under Primary Pedogenic Processes. Russian Agricultural Sciences, 34, 322-324.
    [4]
    Panova G.G., Ermakov E.I., Anikina L.M. Stepanova O.A. (2007) A method of chemical regeneration and sterilization of soil analogues. Inventor?s Certificate of Russian Fed. No. 23021004. Bull. No. 19.
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    ZheltovYu.I. (1986) Vliyaniye sposobov uvlazhneniya korneobitayemykh sred na produktivnost' rasteniy tomata v reguliruyemykh usloviyakh. (Influence of the ways of moistening of root-inhabited environments on the productivity of tomato plants under controlled conditions). Scientific and technical bulletin of agronomic physics. pp. 73-84. (in Russian).
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    Ermakov, E.I. (2009). The controllable technogenic agroecosystem of the noosphere level. In: Ermakov E.I. Selected Works. St. Petersburg. pp. 75-80.
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    Sokolov V.N. (1996) Microworld of argillaceous rocks. Soros Educational Journal. pp. 56-64.
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    Udalova O.R. (2014) Thesis. Technological bases of cultivation of tomato plants under controlled agro-ecosystems. St. Petersburg.
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    Yagodyn BA (1987) Practical work on Agricultural Chemistry. M.
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    MineevaVG (Ed.). (2001) Workshop on Agricultural Chemistry. MSU.M.
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    Ermakov E.I., Medvedeva I.V., Mukhomorov V.K. (1997) Influence of natural organic matter in the nutrient solution on the water-mineral metabolism and productivity of tomato plants under controlled conditions. Agrochemistry. 5, 32-40.
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    GambarovG.M., JuravelN.M., and KorolevY.G. (1990) Statistical modelingand forecasting. Ed. by GrambergA.G.M. Finance and Statistics, (in Russian).
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    Ermakov, E.I., Medvedev I.V. (1985) Optimizatsiya usloviy zhiznedeyatel'nosti korney pri issledovanii vodno-mineral'nogo obmena i potentsial'noy produktivnosti rasteniy tomata. (Optimization of vital activity conditions of the roots in the study of water and mineral metabolism and potential productivity of tomato plants). In: Physiological objective laws of ontogeny and of plant productivity. pp. 155-185.
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    Handbook of Applicable Mathematics. (1990) Chief Editor: Walter Ledermann. Vol. VI: Statistics. Part B. New York-Chichester-Brisbane-Toronto-Singapore. John Wiley & Sons.
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    Sir Kendall N. (1981) Time-Series. London and High Wycombe. Charls Griffin and Company Ltd.
  • Open Access Research Article
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2015, 2(3), 90-94. http://doi.org/10.31586/ImageProcesses.0203.02
    153 Views 251 Downloads PDF Full-text (463.181 KB)  HTML Full-text
    Abstract
    In this paper, we present an overview of Morphological Image Processing and edge detection using gradient based on different operators in MATLAB and developed its GUI (Graphical User Interface). This paper describes the basic technological aspects of Digital Image Processing with reference to Morphological techniques used in image processing. The
    [...] Read more.
    In this paper, we present an overview of Morphological Image Processing and edge detection using gradient based on different operators in MATLAB and developed its GUI (Graphical User Interface). This paper describes the basic technological aspects of Digital Image Processing with reference to Morphological techniques used in image processing. The word morphology commonly denotes a branch of biology that deals with the form and structure of animals and plants. Morphological processing refers to certain operations where an object is hit with a structuring element and thereby reduced to a more revealing shape . Morphology is related to the shapes and digital morphology is a way to describe and analyze the shape of a digital object in image processing. Morphological image processing GUI deals with the detection of X-Ray images and its edge detection process. The complete image processing is done using MATLAB Graphical User Interface Development Environment (GUIDE).  Full article
    Figures

    Figure 1 of 4

    References
    [1]
    Anil K Jain, Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing Ed X, Prentice-Hall of India Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi, 2003.
    [2]
    Gonzalez, Rafael C., Richard E. Woods., Digital Image Processing Ed III, Pearson Education Asia, New Delhi, 2007.
    [3]
    Building GUIs with MATLAB, Version 5
    [4]
    S.Vijayarani, M.Vinupriya, Performance Analysis of Canny and Sobel Edge Detection Algorithms in Image Mining, International Journal of Innovative Research in Computer and Communication Engineering, Vol. 1, Issue 8, October 2013.
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    K.Sreedhar, B.Panlal, Enhancement of Images Using Morphological Transformations, International Journal of Computer Science & Information Technology (IJCSIT) Vol. 4, No 1, Feb 2012, DOI: 10.5121/ijcsit.2012.4103 33.
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    Pinaki Pratim Acharjya, Ritaban Das, Dibyendu Ghoshal, A Study on Image Edge Detection Using the Gradients, International Journal of Scientific and Research Publications, Vol. 2, Issue 12, December 2012 1 ISSN 2250-3153.
    [7]
    Megha Goyal, Morphological Image Processing, IJCST Vol. 2, Issue 4, Oct. - Dec. 2011.
  • Open Access Research Article
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2015, 2(3), 95-103. http://doi.org/10.31586/ChemicalEngineering.0203.03
    43 Views 38 Downloads PDF Full-text (1.543 MB)  HTML Full-text
    Abstract
    The sanctuaries of Demeter and Asklepios are part of the Dion archaeological site that sits among the eastern foothills of Mount Olympus. The main building materials are limestones and conglomerates. Sandstones, marbles, and ceramic plinths were also used. The materials consist mainly of calcite and/or dolomite, whereas the deteriorated surfaces
    [...] Read more.
    The sanctuaries of Demeter and Asklepios are part of the Dion archaeological site that sits among the eastern foothills of Mount Olympus. The main building materials are limestones and conglomerates. Sandstones, marbles, and ceramic plinths were also used. The materials consist mainly of calcite and/or dolomite, whereas the deteriorated surfaces contain also secondary and recrystallized calcite and dolomite, gypsum, various inorganic compounds, fluoroapatite, microorganisms and other organic compounds. Cracks and holes were observed in various parts of the stones. The influence of specific weathering agents and factors to the behavior of the materials was examined. The particular environmental conditions in Dion combine increased moisture and rain fall, insolation and great temperature differences, abundance of intensive surface and underground water bodies in the surrounding area, an area full of plants and trees, therefore, they can cause extensive chemical, biological and mechanical decay of the monuments. The following physical characteristics of the building materials have been studied: bulk density, open porosity, pore size distribution, water absorption and desorption, capillary absorption and desorption. The chemical composition of bulk precipitation, surface and underground water was investigated. The salts presence and crystallization was examined. The influence of the water presence to the behavior of the materials was examined by in situ IR thermometer measurements. Temperature values increased from the lower to the upper parts of the building stones and they significantly depend on the orientation of the walls. The results indicate the existence of water in the bulk of the materials due to capillary penetration. The existence of water in the bulk of the materials due to capillary penetration, the cycles of wet-dry conditions, correlated with the intensive surface and underground water presence in the whole surrounding area, lead to partial dissolution-recrystallization of the carbonate material and loss of the structural cohesion and the surface stability.  Full article
    Figures

    Figure 4 of 9

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    Price, C.A., (1996) ?Stone conservation: an overview of current research? Getty Conservation Institute, Santa Monica, CA, xiii, 73 pp.
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    Winkler, EM., (1997) ?Stone in architecture: properties, durability? Springer-Verlag, Berlin; New York, xvi, 313 pp.
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    Lan, T.T.N., Nishimura, R., Tsujino, Y., Satoh, Y., Thoa, N.T.P., Yokoi, M., Maeda, Y., (2005) ?The effects of air pollution and climatic factors on atmospheric corrosion of marble under field exposure? Corrosion Science, 47, 1023?1038.
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    Skoulikidis, T., (2000) ?Corrosion and conservation of the building materials of the monuments? University Editions of Creta
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    Moreno, F., Vilela, S.A.G, Antunes, A.S.G., Alves, C.A.S., (2006) ?Capillary-rising salt pollution and granitic stone erosive decay in the parish church of Torre de Moncorvo (NE Portugal)-implications for conservation strategy? Journal of Cultural Heritage, 7, 56?66.
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  • Open Access Research Article
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    Trends Journal of Sciences Research 2019, 4(3), 111-120. http://doi.org/10.31586/Chemistry.0403.04
    62 Views 24 Downloads PDF Full-text (1.120 MB) PDF Full-text (1.120 MB)  HTML Full-text
    Abstract
    Abiotic stress especially due heavy metals is one of the major environmental problems that threatens food security and pose greater risks to human health worldwide. In this research, greenhouse hydroponic experiments were carried out to study the morphological and biochemical responses of Sorghum bicolor L.M to different Zinc (Zn) levels.
    [...] Read more.
    Abiotic stress especially due heavy metals is one of the major environmental problems that threatens food security and pose greater risks to human health worldwide. In this research, greenhouse hydroponic experiments were carried out to study the morphological and biochemical responses of Sorghum bicolor L.M to different Zinc (Zn) levels. Two-week-old seedlings transplanted in hydroponic solutions were treated with different doses of Zn in the concentration ranges of 5, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L supplied as ZnSO4. 5H2O. After 21 day of culture, the plants were harvested, blotted to dryness and separated into roots and shoots. The root and shoot lengths, dry weights and non-enzymatic biochemical parameters such as proline, Chlorophyll a, b, Carotenoids (pigments) were determined. The results indicate that Zn applications significantly (P<0.05) depressed the lengths of root and shoot, dry weights and pigment contents compared to untreated plants (control). The effects were more pronounced with increased Zn dosage. The accumulation of the metal and proline contents in treated plants however, increase gradually with increasing Zn concentrations (P<0.05). The changes in these parameters had resulted in toxicity symptoms and overall growth retardation especially at elevated concentrations and the estimated critical toxicity thresholds in both solution and tissue concentrations suggest that sorghum bicolor L.M should not be grown beyond Zn concentration of above 3.2 mg/L.  Full article
    Figures

    Figure 3 of 4

    References
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